Follow African_Tracker on Twitter  Find us on Facebook   

Welcome!

If tracking is a useful aid in your work or if you simply enjoy exploring the wonders of nature through tracking, you’ve come to the right place. Of course, the interweb is no substitute for the great outdoors but it is a great resource for linking print2-homepeople, sharing ideas and learning stuff. And that in a nutshell is what we’re about.

Those with a common interest in tracking are often spread far and wide and don’t cross paths very often. We hope you will use this site to share what you have learnt with others and in turn learn from them. So email us your tracking tips, send us a mystery track or, if you are stumped by some or other track, send us a clear picture of the blighter and we’ll ask our panel of experts to see if they can crack it.

You can also check out our calendar of tracking courses, conferences and other related activities. And don’t forget to send us your tracking stories and keep us posted on what you are up to.

Can you guess this month's Mystery Track

August 2014

Can you guess this month's mystery track?   Submitted By: Oliver Sinclair Track Location: Londolozi, Sa... Read more

August 2014

Inspiration - Recent Articles

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
Prev Next

Elephant Song and Rhino Dance

Category: Stories and Anecdotes

By Fraser Gear The loose rock and shale underfoot forced us to slow our approach to snails pace. Any sound made at this point would alert our quarry and send them hurtling away across the desert plains. With exaggerated care and pounding hearts we peered over the rocky outcrop.  

Read more

On the Trail of Ceratotherium Simum

Category: Stories and Anecdotes

By David Hood   Go on a game drive with rangers in the lowveld and discover some surprising facts about fresh rhino urine!  

Read more

A Comparison Of Buffalo And Eland Tracks

Category: Experience-Based Articles

By David Hood   The tracks of buffalo and eland can cause unexpected confusion – and not without reason.  There is a significant overlap in the size and shape of the prints left by these two magnificent bovids. Historically the distribution ranges of the ungulates in question overlapped far more markedly than they do today.  There is still a certain amount of natural range overlap in Southern Africa, specifically in northern Botswana, the South African lowveld and areas of Zimbabwe.  In addition, large numbers of both species have been translocated to new reserves, particularly in areas such as the Eastern Cape, and now...

Read more

Steenbok And Common Duiker

Category: Experience-Based Articles

By David Hood The steenbok and the common duiker are both ubiquitous in southern Africa and beyond.  Masters of deception both, it is not unusual to find their hoof prints on the outskirts of urban areas.  They are found in numbers on both sides of game fences in all but the most densely forested areas. The common duiker is also referred to as the grey duiker and while ‘common’ is always a demeaning description, ‘grey’ is not always an apt one as the colour of this little antelope varies tremendously across its range.  It has also been called Grimm’s duiker but for...

Read more

A Comparison Of Black-Backed Jackal And Aardwolf Tracks

Category: Experience-Based Articles

By David Hood   The Black-backed Jackal has been the bane of small stock farmers and has vexed hunters in southern Africa for decades.  Large jackal populations can have a significant impact on wild game populations by preying on the young of certain antelope and will take significant numbers of ground nesting birds such as juvenile cranes.  These effects may be pronounced where extralimital species are involved or in unbalanced systems. The aardwolf is similar in size to the jackal and their ranges overlap markedly.  The aardwolf feeds predominantly on harvester termites taking other arthropods less frequently.  Its teeth are highly specialized for...

Read more

A Comparison Of Bat-Eared Fox And Cape Fox Tracks

Category: Experience-Based Articles

By David Hood The Cape Fox, Vulpes chama, is a diminutive canid with a particularly elusive character. A glimpse of its bushy tail disappearing behind an Acacia or into a sandy gully is a reward well worth waiting for. In many areas, even such a shufti of this Southern African endemic is unlikely. Here a few tracks may be the only evidence of its nightly prowlings. The Bat-eared Fox, Otocyon megalotis, is less strict in its nocturnal habits and can be seen across much of its range, often with ears to the ground listening for a juicy beetle larva below the surface...

Read more

Sponsored links

samara
wildlifeactalexvandenheever
cybertracker2